Government of Saskatchewan
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Friday, October 31, 2014

Canada is a democracy with three founding peoples - the First Nations (Aboriginal people of Canada), the French and English.  Through immigration, Canada has become multicultural.  It has federal, provincial and municipal levels of government, all elected by its citizens.

Structure

Saskatchewan's government is made up of people who are both elected and appointed to their positions.

Our Lieutenant-Governor, the direct representative of Her Majesty, Queen Elizabeth II, is the Head of State in the province.  Our Premier heads the decision-making body, the Provincial Cabinet, which is made up of appointed Cabinet ministers, each responsible for a particular government Ministry or other body.  Both the Premier and all Ministers are selected from the Members of the Legislative Assembly who are democratically elected throughout Saskatchewan in political divisions known as constituencies.  The Legislative Assembly meets in the capital city, Regina, in fall and spring sessions when its members debate and propose new laws, and discuss issues affecting Saskatchewan people. 

Local (or municipal) governments have authority over cities, towns, villages and rural municipalities.  They raise funds through property and school taxes for local needs, including maintaining streets and roads, educational facilities, leisure centers, local health care facilities, and policing and fire protection.

Programs and Services

The Government of Saskatchewan has many ministries, crown corporations, boards and agencies that provide programs and services for people in the province.  Ministries deal with many areas of important concern such as health, education, immigration, highways and agriculture.  The provincial ministry in charge of provincial immigration is the Ministry of the Economy

Many of the Government of Saskatchewan's programs and services can be accessed by need in the Life Events directory.  If you are getting married, moving, or even if you lost your wallet, the Life Events directory will assist you.  You can also find programs and services by searching for government telephone numbers in the Blue Pages of your telephone book.  These pages include local government, provincial and federal telephone numbers.  Learn more about the programs and services of the government of Canada, other provinces, or cities in Saskatchewan.  

Government News

The Saskatchewan government issues news releases to inform you of what the government is doing for the people of the province.  If you would like to receive government news releases and other news through your computer, you can subscribe to an RSS News Feed.  You can find Government of Canada's news at the Canada News Centre.

Voting and Elections

In Saskatchewan people can run in an election either as part of a political party or independently without political party support.  Saskatchewan has many political parties and you are allowed to join any of them.

Voting in a Canadian election is free, confidential and democratic.  Before an election, a list of eligible voters is made.  To vote in Saskatchewan, you must be a Canadian citizen on Election Day, be at least 18 years of age, and meet the Saskatchewan residency requirements.  Visit Saskatchewan's electoral system to learn more.

Many multicultural and intercultural organizations speak to the government on behalf of immigrants. However, Members of the Legislative Assembly for your constituency are there to hear the needs of people in their area, including newcomers.  If you would like to meet with your MLA, you can call his or her office to make an appointment.  You do not need to wait until you are a Canadian citizen.  Find Your Constituency or Member of the Legislative Assembly.

Canadian federal elections are traditionally held at approximately four-year intervals.  Canada does not have fixed election dates.

In Saskatchewan, the next provincial government election will be held on November 2, 2015 and every four years after that.

Federally and provincially elections can occur more frequently if the ruling party loses the support of Parliament (Federal) or the Legislative Assembly (Provincial).



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